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1 minute reading time (260 words)

Margaret's Village Block Party Builds Strong Sense of Community

 By Kimberly Rudd, a writer with Rudd Resources


This is an excerpt of a post from The Chicago Fund for Safe and Peaceful Communities blog.

Margaret's Village Development Director Geri Kerger paused to catch her breath. She had been in the midst of describing the activities – the many, many activities – that comprised her organization's September Safe and Peaceful Chicago block party, and the list had become so long that she needed to take a moment to fill her lungs with fresh air to continue.

"Alderman Roderick Sawyer opened the event, and representatives from the Mayor's Office and State Senator Jacqueline Collins' office addressed the crowd of more than 150," she began. "Activist Andrew Holmes gathered the children around and gave a compassionate demonstration on staying safe walking to school. Chauncey Harrison from Teamwork Englewood, a frequent collaborator with Margaret's Village, presented information on the advocacy his group offers." She went on, mentioning the involvement of the Chicago Police Department, the Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence, the Jesse White Tumblers and others.

For Margaret's Village, a full-service social agency in the city's Englewood community, days like this don't happen often. While the agency has planned health fairs for some 15 years, it had never before hosted an event centered on the subject of peace. The grant from the Chicago Fund for Safe and Peaceful Communities made it possible.

"We want people to re-think what's normal. Nonviolence is normal," says Kerger.

Read the full post.

This is a story about the Promote Community Safety and Peace strategy of the Partnership for Safe and Peaceful Communities.

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